At SEC, we have been gratified to see so many of our educational partners be able to begin the process of returning to in-person instruction. Speaking with several of our clients, we have learned that they have recently had the good fortune to access additional financial resources through grants, bonds, and other mechanisms, allowing them to upgrade their safety and security-related assets.

Many of these clients have expressed some uncertainty about the best way to make decisions on how to get the most value out of these resources and how to prioritize the order in which these safety and security upgrade projects are initiated. 

One of the most common mistakes we see is decision-makers focusing on the safety and security solutions without first genuinely understanding their safety and security challenges. We often use the comparison of going to the pharmacist to get a prescription filled without having visited a doctor to see what your diagnosis is.

Therefore, over the next several weeks, we will be guiding you on how to maximize the benefits of these additional resources and how to maintain the value of these other resources in the months and years to come. In doing so, we will focus on the following three areas:

  1. Understanding the differences between threat, vulnerability, and risk
    Although oftentimes used interchangeably, these three elements are unique. As a result, when identifying and addressing your safety and security needs, it is critically important to gain a clear understanding of your unique threat landscape, risk priorities and tolerances, and vulnerability exposures.

  2. Avoiding the pitfalls of taking a “cookie-cutter” or “one size fits all” approach
    The location of your school, the size of your school, and the age of your students are just some of the many factors that can contribute to your school’s unique threat, risk, and vulnerability profile. Because your profile is unique, common sense dictates that the solutions related to your profile should also be unique.

  3. Installation and initial implementation are NOT the finish line
    When a new safety and security resource is introduced into your school, staff members who will have a role in utilizing that resource must be properly trained on how to do so. Furthermore, suppose the introduction of the resource results in a need to develop new or update existing emergency procedures or operating policies. In that case, it is recommended this is completed prior to installation.

We’re excited that the new school year is here, and that many institutions are returning to in-person learning. With that excitement comes some caution, as the new academic year can bring with it some new safety and security challenges. Please know that we are a resource that you can use to help with these challenges.

As always, safety is our top priority. If you would like more information, please reach out to us at [email protected].